Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter

Hello readers of the home improvement blog. Today I would like to introduce my own simple but creative building again. However, before the construction manual follows, I have to digress a bit and want to tell you how it came to the construction of the planter. The history belongs to a self-built raised bed, to which I have unfortunately made no pictures.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planters

My self-built raised bed of Douglas fir wood.

It all started - how could it be otherwise - with a visit to a hardware store, where my wife accompanied me. She discovered this Raised bed for self-construction, This Douglas fir wood structure was about 1 m by 0.5 m with a height of 80 cm. The question of whether it really pleases, settled at the purchase price of about 200 €. "Honey, I can certainly cheaper. Let's take a look at the decking. "As luck would have it, they cost just € 2 per meter and were a lot more stable than the one from the finished raised bed for 200 €, In a nutshell, what I need, what I can use on my own woods and angles and right you see the result, whichself-built only € 100 tasted. The hardware store is therefore a great inspiration.

But now to the actual topic, my flower boxes. They were created because my wife likes the wood Douglas fir very well, the price is currently pleasant and because she has of course not enough space for her plants.

Planning of self-made planters made of Douglas fir

The idea of ​​my wife was planter, which are built like the raised bed, but just a lot smaller, so that the space can be chosen freely and changed at any time. My suggestion: mortar barrels! "The round black things? How should that look? "No, of course not the round, mortar barrels are also square in different sizes, they are very stable, do not rot and above all, they are extremely cheap to have. A flower pot in the same dimensions would cost far more than twice as much.

So we chose two mortar barrels that had a suitable size and so slowly could my wife imagine what I had planned.

  • mortar barrel (Probau - Bauhaus)
    • Capacity: 65 liters
    • Dimensions: 42 cm x 74 cm x 31 cm (width x length x height)
    • Price: 5,25 € (10,50 € for two barrels)

For this we still needed the appropriate Douglas fir decking, These were available in different lengths of 1 m, 2m and 3m. After a quick rollover I took 10 planks to 2 m. Since the price was the same for all variants and I'm sure I'll build something else out of the wood, I did not plan a precise layout and took a measure, which can be stowed well in the car.

  • Douglas fir decking (Bauhaus)
    • Dimensions: 2 mx 12 cm x 2.8 cm
    • Price: 1,95 € per meter (20 x 1,95 € = 39 € for two flower boxes)

In the end it turned out that I would have served with 9 decking, but good overall 50 € for two large and very stable Douglas fir flower boxes, you can give yourself the € 4 for a hallway.

Measuring and cutting the decking

The mortar barrel should later be inside and the edge does not rest on the wood. For this you have to support the barrel inside later, which means additional work, but it looks much better.

To measure, the outer edges of the barrel are measured and given for a little leeway 3 - 4 mm added. In addition, note that the two long sides must cover the faces of the short boards. Here is 2 x the board thickness given.

Starting from the specified dimensions of the mortar barrel (may vary slightly and should be measured individually) we need the Length 80 cm (74 cm + 2x 2.8 cm + 4 mm) and 42.4 cm (42 cm + 4 mm).

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

The cut is quite simple.

With a width (used here as height) of 12 cm, we put three planks on top of each other and thus come with 36 cm something about the mortar barrel height of 31 cm.

  • Cutting decking:
    • 6 x 80 cm
    • 6 x 42.4 cm

The later direct screwing together of the planks would be possible with a thickness of just under 3 cm, but it would be missing a connection of the planks on top of each other. Therefore, we put in the corners and on the half of the long sides in addition roof battens, where we attach the floorboards later.

As a measure of the cut we take the three planks on top of each other with 36 cm. Since the edge of the mortar barrel also takes up space, the slats could also be cut shorter. But we'll come to that later.

  • Cutting roof battens:
    • 12 x 36 cm

Remove handles from the mortar cask

Real guns do not have such mortar barrels, but slight reinforcements are appropriate, which are slightly over the edge. If you do not mind it, you can leave it that way, but you have to live with the fact that the edge deforms a bit later. I decided to remove the handles.

In the first attempt, I put a crossbar in front of it and tried to cut off the supernatant with the cutter knife. That was pretty tedious and not very effective. So sawed off the multifunction tool and the handles flush with the wooden staff. That went quickly and the edge looked all around now uniform.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

It is tedious with the cutter knife.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: yourself

The oscilation tool is much faster.

Drill holes for screwing the planter

Before we start assembling, the screw holes have to be pre-drilled. This prevents the wood from bursting.

To measure we put the mortar barrel with the opening down on the workbench and pile up a corner with the planks. Then a sawn batten is placed in the corner. This is as long as the three decking boards on top of each other, but is down on the covenant on tap. As a result, the batten sticks out and later forms feet that lift the planter slightly off the ground.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: mortar

Measure each to the middle of the bar

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: yourself

and thus determine the measure for drilling.

Now a point that gave me a lot of pleasure: I set up the bench drill with stops and my wife has drilled the holes. The fact is certainly nothing special, but she noticed how important good tools are. "That's great. It took me five times as long to draw and use a cordless drill. " This goes down like oil and the next discussion about buying tools will certainly be a lot easier.

But back to the construction of the planter. When drilling the boards, care must be taken that the holes between the short and long boards are slightly offset in height. Otherwise you run the risk that the screws later meet in the batten and tilt.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planter

With stops, the holes are made fix.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

Attention: move holes in height.

Assembly of the planter

Now we can start with the assembly, for which we turn the mortar barrel upside down again and thus determine the mounting position of the first batten. Fix briefly and the first screw can be screwed in.

On the next screw and especially on the second side, always check that everything is at an angle. Later nothing can be corrected.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planters

Fix the height of the batten.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: yourself

Pay attention to the angularity.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: mortar

The front ends are finished.

Similar and above all again with an angle, then the long boards are screwed on. To do this, stack up all three planks and, if necessary, convey small differences in the cut. The wood works in the open later anyway and little projections are hardly noticeable.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planter

Check angle and fix.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

Convey small mistakes.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planters

The planter is almost ready.

Build additional supports (feet) and the planter

So that our planter later carries the burden of the earth, he needs additional feet on the long sides, which we attach now.

For this we put the bucket on its feet and can place the additional feet directly on the workbench. Align now in the middle and at an angle and already they can be screwed on.

As the holder for the mortar cask is attached to the middle feet later with earth, the lower screw connection may be a bit more massive. Alternatively, however, may also be bricks or something similar, which is later simply placed under the mortar. The additional stabilization may therefore be quite creative.

After a treatment with oil, glaze or whatever is desired, the planter can be stocked. But do not forget the holes in the bottom of the mortar barrel to prevent waterlogging.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: yourself

Fix and screw on additional feet.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: yourself

Additional supports carry the heavy mortar.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: planters

The planter is ready for oiling or glazing.

Douglas fir wood enters our garden

My wife likes Douglas fir and there will surely be more projects to follow. Three have already become and see what I can think of.

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

Planter from Douglas fir

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: Douglas

Birdhouse for surveillance cameras

Planting planters yourself - Douglas fir planter: mortar

Raised bed of Douglas fir


Picture sources:
all pictures: Riccardo Düring

Video Board: Dutchman Planter - Bare Root Material