Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

Ricc - I blog for you

For a long time, it irritated me and now I was finally able to test a pocket hole system. A thank you to wolfcraft for that. I would have liked to compare it to a Kreg Jig, but for a test the price is a bit high. So it remains with the cheaper version of wolfcraft, the wolfcraft Undercover Jig.

At first glance, there is nothing to complain about the price (suitable for the device). The Undercover Jig is available at Amazon for € 47.90 and I think that is realistic for the contents of the suitcase. But whether the investment will pay, will show.

The packaging and its contents

The wolfcraft Undercover Jig comes in a small suitcase, which I like - as always - good, because I do not like blister packs, where you are desperate when opening and cut their fingers to dispose of them later. So the packaging, not the fingers. Here is already the first plus for a suitcase. The suitcase includes beside the Undercover Jig also some accessories.

  • Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: hole

    1 x wolfcraft Undercover Jig
  • 1 x HSS step drill 180 mm
  • 1 x PZ2 bit 150 mm
  • 1 x locking ring
  • 1 x Allen key SW 3
  • 10 x special wooden dowels
  • 10 x countersunk screws 4 x 25 mm
  • 10 x countersunk screws 4 x 30 mm
  • 10 x countersunk screws 4 x 40 mm
  • 10 x countersunk screws 4 x 60 mm

That looks absolutely okay and except for a screw clamp and a cordless screwdriver or a drill, nothing is needed. Even if in the case under the Undercover Jig or the use actually still place would be. So you can possibly stow more screws. Otherwise, everything is clearly arranged and durable. Desirable would be only a label of the screw sizes.

The manual is needed only once

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: Undercover

operation manual

... then the use is known and since it is not really complicated, I think the manual can be disposed of. Only the indication of which screw is required for which board thickness might be interesting for one or the other. Not for me, but we come to the practical part.

I like the instructions only conditionally. On the one hand, the leaflet is enormously large and, on the other hand, the images lack quality. However, the individual work steps are described very well and above all comprehensible. The view of the pictures serves more to control. The shortcoming is, however, relative, because the instructions are needed only once. Therefore, it is sufficient for this.

Step by step to Pocket Hole Connection

If the instructions are not clear enough, I'll show you all the steps here in more detail. No problem, I like to do that. ?

Of course, it's also about introducing the functionality and seeing how easy it is to use it. Therefore, you may now accompany me step by step in my first pocket hole and wood joints. For this first attempt, I used old pieces of spruce glulam and split it in the middle. In the second the same, with a little harder Buchenleimholz.

Measure and set up drills

The wolfcraft Undercover Jig brings its own measure and so can the board thickness (if not known) quickly determine. In my case, the 18 mm spruce glulam has a thickness of 17 mm. Sounds funny, but it is. Maybe the undercover jig is inaccurate? Honestly, I did not really test that, because it did not really affect my work, I was actually aware of the measure and I only "measured" it for a photo. But does not matter because the measure is set in the following only in larger steps. That would be the next "big" task. At the Undercover Jig the lock is unlocked and the next smaller measurement is set. Whether 17mm or 18mm has been measured is minor, the next dimension is 12mm. Here I would actually want more gradations to be able to set a more exact measure. Just these 18 mm are a very common measure in German hardware stores.

The next step is to set the drilling depth. To do this, place the Undercover Jig on its back and guide the drill into the right-hand hole. The alignment takes place at the shoulder of the step drill and the line between 12 and 19 mm. In this position, the locking ring is clamped to the drill. That's it - the Undercover Jig is ready.

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

Measure board thickness

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: Undercover

Next set smaller size

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: Undercover

Set depth limit

The board can be drilled

After the Undercover Jig is set up, it is already boring. For this purpose (as in the case of measuring) the stop is turned, the edge is applied to the board and the jig is clamped to the board. Now it is ready for drilling. It should also be mentioned that the two drill guides prove to be very helpful. Thus, the jig can be aligned on the outer edge of the board and the drilling distance can be selected individually through the two drill guides. Here you should rather leave some space, in order to be able to use later angle clamps.

For soft wood, drill very carefully and at high speed as the wood will tear out quickly due to the shallow drilling angle. But that has little to do with the Undercover Jig - the drill is sharp and cuts well.

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

brace

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: Undercover

Drill

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

Finished

Screws and almost done

Now we come back to the manual, which I supposedly no longer need to screw choice. According to this, I should choose the next small board thickness (12 mm at 18 mm) and use screws of 4 x 25 mm. In my test, I found that they are very short and find little support in softwood. This is probably due to the relatively large jump between 18 mm and 12 mm, but certainly also inaccuracies in the orientation and alignment. So I put the two boards on top of each other and put different screws in the holes (I will do that again and again). And lo and behold, even the next size 4 x 30 mm still has enough space.

Once the correct screw size has been determined, both boards can be clamped and screwed together. Since the screw hits the lower timber at an angle, the bracing is very important. Otherwise it will be moved quickly and inaccurate connections will be created.

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

Select screw size

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: Undercover

Use angle clamps

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: hole

Ready screwed

Dowel holes

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: pocket

Hide hole with a wooden dowel

I am a fast screw man, that's why I like the Undercover Jig from wolfcraft. "Men of the beautiful screw," the screwing but finally like to hide. The manufacturer supplies prefabricated dowels with appropriately sawn angles. For thinner wood it is necessary to shorten the dowels, certainly not for thicker ones. For testing purposes, I simply drilled a bit deeper into 18 mm laminated wood, omitted the screw and was able to insert the dowel completely. Was only for a test, how it works. Although the dowel is very accurately made and can be difficult to insert, sitting from the angle but absolutely perfect.

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: hole

Wooden dowels finished shortened and sanded

Finished, it looks really good. The effort is worth in my opinion, but only partially. With the Undercover Jig I can choose if I screw inside or outside, so I can choose the side that I do not see afterwards. If I want to see nowhere screws, then I use glue and dowels. Furthermore, it is no longer possible after loosening the wooden dowels to loosen the screws again, which is just the advantage of a screw. That's a matter of taste and everyone has to decide for themselves. I have tested the wooden dowels and is a little better than me, paid attention to the color and grain, is afterwards hardly anything of a connection to see.

The Turbo Test - How fast is the wolfcraft Undercover Jig?

Respectively, how fast am I? For this I sawed a board made of beechwood, put everything necessary and stopped the time. At the same time I also wanted to see how the holes in harder wood. What can I say? - My wife is right. I am too fast for this world. In about three minutes, the wolfcraft Undercover Jig is set up, the holes are drilled and the boards bolted. Well, in the video of wolfcraft is the talk of two minutes, but with a little more practice and without my serenity, that is certainly not a problem.

Finally, there was a little gimmick and I screwed two thin wooden strips on miter. Is certainly atypical, but that works too. In addition, you can quickly make narrow picture frames.

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

Everything ready to go

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: hole

Great time

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: hole

That too is possible

My quick conclusion

I like the wolfcraft Undercover Jig. Is it enough, right? ? Of course I can say a few words:

Pocket Hole is in and I'm now an undercover jig too: wolfcraft

my full recommendation

The Undercover Jig makes a solid impression, works flawlessly and it can be made within a very short test good screw connections. My expectations were exceeded and I found a really great workshop assistant in it. I can not imagine what could be greatly improved. Maybe a finer adjustment of the board thickness, but if the screws are selected according to my approach, I see no handicap in the current variant. The only big mistake was not getting this tool into my workshop.

Since I had almost forgotten a small suggestion for improvement: Although all other screws can be used and buy another long bit, but in that point wolfcraft could go a little bit over time and change the accessories to Torx. My stock of screws contains only remnants of Phillips screws and, as I know from other home improvement, they hold it similar.

Other examples of using pocket holes: Build a shelf with pocket holes

Video Board: Beginner's guide to pocket hole joinery | WOODWORKING BASICS